Log in Subscribe
My Take

Holidays

Mark McGee
Posted 10/8/22

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas, and we haven’t even sent out the trick-or-treaters.  

Those of us who plan to celebrate Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas this …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in
My Take

Holidays

Posted

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas, and we haven’t even sent out the trick-or-treaters.  

Those of us who plan to celebrate Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas this year should expect to pay much more for the privilege.  

With gatherings of families and friends expected to return after two years of pandemic fears of groups meeting the increased costs may put a damper on some gatherings or result in some menu changes.  

Leaves may be starting to fall, but the price of Halloween is rising. If you plan to carve a jack-o-lantern for Halloween expect to pay more than last year. The website Finder reports the average pumpkin price is $5.40 compared to $4.83 last year.  

According to several news reports, pumpkins are especially scarce in Tennessee because the rains came at the wrong time to have thriving patches. It would be difficult for even Charles Schulz’s cartoon character Linus to find “the most sincere” pumpkin patch to await the arrival of “the great pumpkin.”  

In keeping with the cartoon theme inflation has become “the grinch” that not only steals Christmas but could rob many of not only elaborate Halloween celebrations but Thanksgiving dinner as well.  

Inflation and bird flu are being given the credit for turkey price increases to the highest per pound cost ever. ABC News reports boneless, skinless turkey breast is hovering near $7 per pound. It is the highest since 2015 when the price was $5.88 a pound.  

Most of us buy frozen turkeys for the big feast. Retail price predictions are more than $30 for a 16-pound frozen bird. Expect to pay more than ever for your turkey regardless of what kind you buy.  

And finally, there is Christmas. The ads have already started and some of the cable channels have placed Christmas movies in their rotation.  

I have no problem with the early rollout of the holiday films. I can’t watch “Love Actually” or “It’s A Wonderful Life” enough.  

Amazon is having a holiday sale in October beating the November “Black Friday” rush. If you go to a store looking for Halloween-related items, be careful not to trip over the already burgeoning Christmas displays.  

Whether you like to cut your own tree at a tree farm or purchase a freshly cut tree at one of these farms or you go to a retail store expect to pay more for your Christmas centerpiece as well.  

The Real Christmas Tree Board has surveyed growers and estimates of increases range from five percent to 20 percent over last year.  

It is expected there will be no shortage of turkeys in stores, but like pumpkins, Christmas trees will once again be scarce.  

I have heard at least one report suggesting if you want a tree that won’t disappoint you then you might want to turn off a football game and make that purchase Thanksgiving weekend.  

Yes, it’s looking like the time of year to empty your wallet in order to make your holidays bright. 

Comments

No comments on this item Please log in to comment by clicking here